Human Microchipping: Would You Consider Having An Implant In Your Hand?

Wave of the future? (WBMA)

UPDATE- In March, Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb signed legislation which prohibits companies from forcing workers to implant microchips. That state joins California, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Wisconsin, and Utah with similar legislation. There are no known cases of businesses requiring employees to be ‘microchipped.’

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBMA) – Some see microchips implanted in humans as the wave of the future. Others see an uncertain path with questions about privacy and ethics.

The microchipping has gained some popularity in Sweden which already has a robust digital society. A few companies in the U.S. have also tried it with their workers on a voluntary basis.
“One of the biggest concerns is the unintended consequences of the ability to track where bodies are in the most fundamental sense,” warns Associate Professor Michael Zimmer, PhD with the Dept. of Computer Science at Marquette University. He has researched privacy issues and ethics related to technology.
He advises we need to proceed with caution when it comes to this technology. He says there may be more temporary solutions like an erasable tattoo or wearable technology like the Apple watch or fit bit that can accomplish the same things.
The chips can be used to unlock doors, start cars, eliminate the need for work pass cards and offer options to pay for things. They could also be used to hold medical information and could be very helpful in emergencies.

The chips are about the size of a grain of rice. They can be removed but are not FDA approved. The cost ranges from $150-200.